Saturday, 23 August 2014

Stir-fried Qing Long Vegetables With Shrimps 清壟菜炒虾球

Stir-fried Qing Long Vegetables With Shrimps 清壟菜炒虾球


Recipe source :  Doris Choo @ Sumptuous Flavours

The market vendors called this Qing Long vegetables. They look like a cross between leeks and chives. The market vendors assured us that the taste is good. SK was gamed to try and so we bought a small bunch to stir-fry with shrimps.

Mmm, not bad at all. In fact they tasted very good!

Do try them out if you come across them in the market.

Ingredients


200g green qing long vegetables, cut into sections
150g prawns, remove shells and tails
1 tbsp chopped garlic
2 tbsp cooking oil


Seasonings


1 tbsp oyster sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 Chinese rice bowl of water
1/s tsp cornflour dissolved in 1 Chinese rice bowl of water



Qing long vegetables - looks like a cross between leeks and chives


Method


1.  Heat wok until hot. Add 2 tbsp cooking oil. 
2.  Saute garlic until fragrant, add in the prawns and fry until they turn pinkish.
3.  Add in the vegetables and stir-fry for 1 minute.
4.  Add in seasoning ingredients and let it boil for 1 minute. 
5.  Dish up and serve immediately with rice.
 


Saturday, 16 August 2014

Mini Kampar Chicken Curry In A Bread 咖哩面包鸡

Mini Kampar Chicken Curry In A Bread 咖哩面包鸡




Recipe source for the bread :  Frozen Wings
Recipe source for the chicken curry :  Doris Choo @ Sumptuous Flavours

A few weeks back I made Special Steamed Chicken Curry Pau, which is a modified version of the famous Kampar chicken curry bread. My youngest son, YS has been pestering me to make the baked version. I know the normal size bread ( 面包鸡 ) will be too big for the three of us at home, so I used the same concept of the special steamed chicken curry pau to bake three smaller bread. We gave one to my sister-in-law who lives a few blocks away while we polished off the remaining two bread. 

Yummy, yum! They were truly scrumptious and finger-licking good!


Ingredients for Chicken Curry ( recipe by Doris Choo @ Sumptuous Flavours )


1/2 a chicken ( about 550g )
1 large potato, peeled and cut into cubes, then deep-fried
2 1/2 tbsp curry powder
80g minced chilli
80g shallots, finely chopped
30g garlic, finely chopped
1 cup coconut milk  ( santan)
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp soya sauce
4 tbsp cooking oil 

Utensils required


3 aluminium foil cups
3 pieces of aluminium foils


Preparation 


1.  Heat wok until hot. Add in 4 tbsp cooking oil.
2.  Saute chopped garlic and shallots until fragrant. Reduce to medium flame. Add in minced chilli. Stir to mix well.  
3.  Add 2 tbsp coconut milk , followed by the curry powder. Stir evenly until red chilli oil oozes out. 
4.  Add in chicken pieces and mix well. Fry for 2 to 3 minutes. 
5.  Add in 4 Chinese rice bowls of water. Bring to a boil.
6.  Pour in the deep-fried potatoes. Stir to mix well.
7.  Allow to simmer for about 12 to 15 minutes until done.
8.  Remove and let it cool down before spooning the chicken curry into 3 aluminium foil cups.
9.  Cover the foil cups with pieces of aluminium foils.   

 

For the bread ( recipe from Lena of Frozen wings )

Ingredient A
450g bread flour
25g milk powder
15g instant yeast
60g sugar
1/2 tsp salt

Ingredient B
1 large egg, beaten mixed with 130ml cold milk + 130ml cold water

 40g butter

Method


1. Add  all ingredients A into a mixing bowl of a machine and use a fork to stir till well mixed. Using a dough hook, add in ingredients B slowly and beat roughly for about 5 minutes until it forms a moist firm ball.
2.  Add in butter and beat for around 5-10 minutes until the dough looks smooth. Remove dough into slightly floured table and knead into a big ball and let it proof for about 45 minutes.
3. After proofing, lightly knead the dough again and let rest for another 10 minutes.
4. Divide dough into three portions. Roll out the dough into three rounds with the middle thicker than the sides. ( See picture below )  Place this on top of the sealed aluminium cups. Seal the edges below the aluminium cups and place each on three different pieces of greased-proof paper. Transfer this to a baking tray and let it rise for another 40 minutes.
5. Apply egg wash (optional) and bake it in a  preheated oven at 170 C for 20 minutes.




 Let the middle portion be thicker than the surrounding edges.
Place this dough on top of the sealed aluminium cup containing the chicken curry. 
This way - It will be easier to seal the thinner edges below the aluminium cup. 



Yum! Finger-licking good!
 

I am linking this post to Little Thumbs Up

Photobucket

The theme for August 2014 is Flour

Hosted by  Domestic Goddess Wannabe





Wednesday, 13 August 2014

Taiwanese Breakfast : Egg Pancake Roll 蛋饼

Taiwanese Breakfast : Egg Pancake Roll 蛋饼



Recipe source :  Adapted from Butterfingers

There were so many blogs featuring this egg pancake roll that I had a hard time deciding which recipe to cook. I finally chose this recipe which appeared to be comparatively easy to follow. But then I discovered to my dismay that l do not have the flair to toss and roll the pancake to perfection! Mind you, in reality, it wasn't that easy to roll the pancakes!

Well, anyway, here's my humble attempt to make this popular Taiwan breakfast egg pancake rolls. Enjoy!

Pssst, I being a true Malaysian, must find my bottle of indispensable chilli sauce to go with this!

Ingredients ( makes 2 pancake)


100g all purpose flour
1 1/2 cups warm water
1/2 tsp cooking oil
1 stalk of spring onion, chopped
Oil for frying
A pinch of salt
2 eggs, beaten and divide into 2 portions
2 stalks parsley, chopped and divide into 2 portions
1 tsp oyster sauce, divide into 2 portions



Method


1.  Make the pancake mixture by pouring warm water to the flour and stir to mix well. Add in chopped spring onions.
2.  Heat a non-stick frying pan and drizzle a little cooking oil into the frying pan. Pour in half the pancake mixture to make a pancake. Cook until golden. Flip over and cook the other side. Remove pancakes to a plate.
3.  Repeat with the remaining batter to make another pancake. Remove pancakes to a plate.
4.  Divide beaten eggs into 2 portions. Add in half of the chopped parsley and 1/2 tsp oyster sauce.
5.  Heat frying pan and add in a drizzle of oil. Pour in egg mixture to coat the entire frying pan.
6.  Immediately, add in one prepared pancake onto the frying eggs. Let them stick together.
7.  Flip over and warm the other side. Remove onto a plate
8.  Roll up the pancake and cut into slices of about 2 cm.





I am submitting this post to Asian Food Fest #10 August 2014  : Taiwan 
Hosted by Alan Goh of Travelling Foodies


I am also linking this post to Little Thumbs Up

Photobucket

The theme for August 2014 is Flour

Hosted by  Domestic Goddess Wannabe

Monday, 11 August 2014

Deep-fried Prawns

Deep-fried Prawns


Recipe source :  Doris Choo of Sumptuous Flavours.

My family call this "chau har-look", literally meaning deep-fried prawn. I have a very deep  impression of this wonderful prawn dish. I ate this the first time during my late grandfather's birthday. I was probably five or six years old at that time. I still have vague memories of the house being crowded with uncles, aunts, countless numbers of cousins, other relatives and friends of our large extended family. And I had recollection of large basins of deep-fried prawns set aside on a table, waiting to be arranged onto serving platters for the grand birthday bash. I remember tents being set up around the large sprawling village home to accommodate so many people gathered together.

My family's original recipe probably used a combination of all-purpose flour and rice flour with a sprinkling of salt and pepper. Over the years, my aunts and my horde of cousins have added various other ingredients to improve and enhance the taste of the batter. 

All these years I have never attempted to make this until I met some of my relatives recently and we started talking about the good old days. One thing led to another and here is the modified version after adjusting the recipe and gleaning some "secrets"  from the many aunts and cousins who all wanted a say as to what ingredients should go into the batter.  It was fun listening to the friendly banter!

Ingredients

500g medium-sized prawns, remove shells but keep the tails
4 tbsp tapioca flour
oil for deep frying

Marinade for prawns

1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar

Marinate prawns for about 30 minutes


Ingredients for batter


50g plain flour
50g tapioca flour
50g rice flour
1 tbsp custard powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp baking powder
a dash of pepper
some chopped spring onions or Chinese parsley
150ml water
2 tbsp oil
1/2 tsp salt


Method


1.  Mix all the ingredients of the batter until smooth. Set aside.
2.  Heat enough oil in a wok for deep-frying. Heat until hot.
3.  Dredge marinated prawns into the 4 tbsp of tapioca flour. Then dip this dredged prawn into the batter to coat it evenly except the last bit of the prawn's tail.
4.  Place the prawn into hot oil and fry both sides until golden.
5.  Remove and drain on absorbent towels.





I am linking this post to Little Thumbs Up

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The theme for August 2014 is Flour

Hosted by  Domestic Goddess Wannabe



Friday, 8 August 2014

Braised Pork On Rice (Lu Rou Fan) 滷肉飯

Braised Pork On Rice (Lu Rou Fan) 滷肉飯


Recipe source :  Taiwan Duck

Accordingly to Joanne of Taiwan Duck, Lou Rou Fan is a traditional meal of the Taiwanese farming families. Over the years, its popularity has spread to become so popular that Lou Rou Fan is almost synonymous with Taiwan. 

I remember seeing hawkers at the Shihlin night market in Taiwan doing  brisk business selling this simple and very delicious rice. They were served in tiny bowls with just braised pork on top. Eggs are optional at additional costs. The tiny bowl of braised pork on rice can be quite filling and makes a very satisfying meal. I remember my two sons were crazy over it and ate several bowls of this braised pork on rice with other delicacies that the Shilhlin night market has to offer.

Joanne stressed that the slab of pork must be cut into tiny cubes instead of taking the easy way out by using minced meat. So I diligently followed her instructions for I believe there must be a difference since she had stressed that her instructions be followed.

The health conscious might be put-off by the excessive oil. I suggest you eat this with a ready pot of Chinese tea at hand to neutralise the fat.  

Lu Rou Fan tastes terrific!

Ingredients ( serves 4 to 5 people)


600g pork, cut into tiny cubes of 0.5cm square
3 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp dark soya sauce
1 large piece of rock sugar, or use about 3 tsp of sugar
4 shallots, minced
5 pips garlic, minced
5 eggs, hard-boiled and remove shells
3 tbsp shao hsing wine
2 tbsp dried shrimps, soaked until soft and coarsely chopped
2 star anise
1/2 tsp five-spice powder
some cooked  rice


 Pork cut into tiny cubes

 Dried shrimps - need to soak until soft and coarsely chopped

Left : star anise. Right : five-spice powder

Method


1.  Heat a wok until hot. Add the pork cubes and dry-fry until water has evaporated and oil oozes out.
2.  Add in the minced garlic and minced shallots. Continue to stir-fry until fragrant.
3.  Add in the coarsely chopped dried shrimps.
4.  Then add in five-spice powder and star anise. Continue to stir-fry.
5.  Add in hot water to cover the pork pieces. Add in half the amount of shao hsing wine.
6.  Add in the rock sugar, soy sauce and dark soya sauce.
7.  Add in the hard-boiled eggs to the pork and gravy. Turn the eggs to ensure they are evenly coloured.
8.  Allow to simmer for about 20 minutes or until the gravy is almost dry.





I am submitting this post to Asian Food Fest #10 August 2014 : Taiwan 
Hosted by Alan Goh of Travelling Foodies


Wednesday, 6 August 2014

Chinese Spring Onion Pancake 蔥油餅

Chinese Spring Onion Pancake 蔥油餅


Recipe source :  Wantanmien

It is amazing that such simple ingredients of just using plain flour, a little salt and some chopped spring onions can yield such a tasty pancake. 

Spring onion pancakes are popularly eaten at breakfast by the Chinese, but hardly by our local Malaysian Chinese as we grew up feasting on roti canai instead of spring onion pancakes! Come to think of it, there are similarities between the Chinese spring onion pancakes and our local roti canai. 

However, I would not dare to venture into making comparisons between these two pancakes because geographically we are different and our lifestyles or our ways of life are vastly different. So, suffice to say that I find this spring onion pancake tasty. I like the outer skin which is crispy and I just love the fragrance of spring onion in each bite. Nice!

However, both my hubby and my son did not share my enthusiasm. 

It is all a matter of preference. 


Ingredients


225g all-purpose flour
150ml warm water
2 stalks of spring onions, chopped
a little salt
some oil

 Chopped spring onions

Salt. 
Use sparingly as it can be very salty for a small pancake.

Method


1.  Pour flour into a bowl. 
2.  Add warm water. Stir well. Cover the bowl and allow it to rest for 10 minutes.
3.  After 10 minutes, knead to form a soft dough. Divide the dough into 10 equal portions.
4.  Roll out one portion into a flat circle. Brush oil over the entire circle. Sprinkle a little bit of salt and spring onions onto the circle. Use salt sparingly as it can be very salty for a small pancake.
5.  Then roll up one end to form a cylindrical shaped dough. Bend one end of the cylindrical dough to form a circle. Then flatten it to form a small pancake. It is okay if the dough burst open when you roll it.
6.  Repeat the process with the remaining dough. Sprinkle some flour onto the pancakes to prevent them from sticking together.
7.  Heat a frying pan and add some oil. Fry the pancakes on both sides until golden.
8.  Ready to serve.





I am linking this post to Little Thumbs Up

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The theme for August 2014 is Flour

Hosted by  Domestic Goddess Wannabe




Saturday, 2 August 2014

Spicy Iron Eggs 铁蛋

Spicy Iron Eggs 铁蛋


Recipe source :  Adapted from Flavours & Fortune, Spring volume : 2006 issue 13 ( 1 )

According to Wikipedia, iron eggs were created by a restaurateur who served snacks to the dock hands in a seaside town in Taiwan. It was discovered by chance on one rainy day when business was slow. Because of the slow business, she had to continually recook the eggs to keep them warm after taking them out of the stew. The recooking and drying process eventually resulted in eggs that were dark, flavourful, and chewy. They were extremely popular with the locals in Taiwan. The restaurateur eventually founded a new business based on her iron egg recipe, selling them under the brand Apotiedan : 阿婆鐵蛋; literally: "Grandma's iron eggs"). 

Iron eggs are a specialty of Danshui, a town situated to the north-eastern part of Taipei, Taiwan. They are usually made from chicken or quail eggs. This popular snack is easily available along the streets and stalls which lined the roads of Danshui. It is so popular that iron eggs are now among the top rated national snacks of Taiwan.

The making of iron eggs is a very tedious process. It involves boiling, cooling down the eggs and reboiling again to achieve the desired dark colour and chewiness. All in, we repeated this tedious process eleven times.  But of course, the result was well worth all the effort we put in.

My youngest son was really excited when he knew I was making iron eggs. In fact he was hovering around me to watch the work-in-progress for he wanted to observe first-hand how the eggs changed in colour and texture as I boiled and reboiled the eggs over and over again. He actually helped to set up an extra fan to expedite the cooling-down process of the eggs.   

My son and I, do not eat egg yolks but for these iron eggs, we made an exception because the whole egg was so chewy and bursting with flavours! And I especially like the quail eggs because I can easily pop the whole tiny egg into my mouth! Mmmmm, delicious!

N.B. -  A point to note is that the eggs tend to crack due to the repeated boiling and handling. So do be very careful and gentle in handling the eggs.

Ingredients


1 fresh chilli, bruised
 5 chicken eggs, hard boiled and remove shells
15 quail eggs, hard boiled and remove shells
4 tbsp thick soya sauce
4 tbsp soy sauce
6 cups prepared black tea ( I used pu-erh tea )
60g cane rock sugar


Mixed Spices


2 star anise
3 pieces liquorice
1 small piece tangerine peel
5 cloves
5 green cardamom
1 piece cinnamon bark ( about 3 cm long )
1/2 tsp Sichuan pepper corns

Top row: Cinnamon bark, cloves and cardamon
Bottom row: Star anise, dried tangerine peel and Sichuan peppercorns
Extreme right: Liquorice ( kam choe )

Chilli and cane rock sugar

Preparation


1.  Place 6 cups of black tea, hard boiled eggs and the mixed spices into a medium-sized pot. Bring to the boil, then reduce heat to medium and simmer for 10 minutes. Turn off heat. Remove the eggs from pot.
2.  Air-dry the eggs by using an electric fan. Once eggs has cooled down, place the eggs back into the pot to boil again for 10 minutes.
3.  Repeat the process for 10 times until the eggs are dark brown. 

These pictures are to be viewed from left to right and from top down - 
You can see the interesting changes in hue of these eggs 
from light to darker brown as they were being boiled and air-dried repeatedly.



I am submitting this post to Asian Food Fest #10 August 2014  : Taiwan 
Hosted by Alan Goh of Travelling Foodies


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