Sunday, 19 October 2014

Mixed Vegetables Curry 素咖哩

Mixed Vegetables Curry 素咖哩

Recipe :  Doris Choo @ Sumptuous Flavours


My sister's Indian friend taught her to use radish to cook curry. Since then, my personal preference has always been radish in my curries instead of using potatoes. However, because of my family's preference for potatoes, I have always refrained from using radish. Today I made an exception. I re-introduced the use of radish for cooking a mixed vegetables curry. 

I am not sure whether it was because I have not been cooking mixed vegetables curry for a long time or because the family has a change of preference, but the bottom line was that the two large bowls of curry were demolished. Nobody grumbled about not finding potatoes. Everybody ate happily and polished off the rice and the vegetables. The quantity I cooked could easily feed five to six people yet the three of us wolfed down everything. 



Ingredients


500g radish, cut into pieces
250g snake beans, cut into sections of  4 cm
15 pieces of tofu puff
400g cabbage, cut into sections of 4 cm
100g minced chilli
3 tbsp curry powder
300ml coconut milk (santan)
8 shallots, minced
6 pips garlic, minced
3 sprigs curry leaves
3 stalks lemon grass, bruised
6 tbsp oil
1250ml water


Seasoning


2 tsp salt
4 tsp sugar
1 tbsp soy sauce

Method


1.  Heat wok until hot. Add in oil. Saute minced garlic and shallots for 1 minute over medium flame. Keep stirring to prevent burning. Add in the bruised lemon grass and curry leaves. Continue to fry until fragrant. 
2.  Add in minced chilli paste and stir to mix well. Add in half a cup of coconut milk and stir-fry until oil oozes out. 
3.  Add in radish and snake beans and fry for 2 minutes. Add in water and the remaining coconut milk.
4.  Bring to a boil. Then add in tofu puff and cabbage. Let it boil for 15 minutes or until the radish is tender.
5.  Add in seasoning ingredients.
6.  Switch off flame and dish up.







Hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well In Flanders and 
co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House


Thursday, 16 October 2014

Sweet Jelly Delight

Sweet Jelly Delight


Recipe source :  Doris Choo @ Sumptuous Flavours

Sweet memories from my childhood - cool and refreshing jellies. These are among the few simple treats that I learnt to make as a youngster. Unlike now, back in the old days there aren't desserts to be bought in small towns. Whatever you crave to eat, you've got to do-it-yourself. D-I-Y's the word!

I love to eat them as a child, and even now, the child in me continues relishing these wonderfully cool and refreshing jellies!

It is great to have these sweet jellies on hot sunny days or as desserts after a sumptuous meal. 



Ingredients for the red layer

10g agar-agar strips
60g sugar
700ml water
1 pandan (screw-pine) leaf, knotted
 A few drops of red food colouring


Ingredients for the white layer

10g agar-agar strips
60g sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 coconut, grated
1 pandan (screw-pine) leaf, knotted
700ml water


Method

1.  Place water, pandan leaf and agar-agar strips into a small pot and boil until the agar-agar has dissolved.
2.  Add in sugar and red food colouring. Keep warm.
3.  Add water to the grated coconut and squeeze out the santan or coconut milk. Add in 1/2 tsp salt.
4.  Place santan, pandan leaf and agar-agar strips to boil until the agar-agar is dissolved. Add in sugar. keep warm.
5.  Spoon 1 ladle of red jelly into cups or moulds of your choice. Wait for it to be almost set. Then add in the white layer. Top up with another red layer.
6.  Repeat the process until the red and white jellies are used up. 
7.  Chill in refrigerator until cold. 
8.  Serve chilled.






Tuesday, 14 October 2014

Braised Pumpkin With Black Fungus 黑木耳焖南瓜

Braised Pumpkin With Black Fungus 黑木耳焖南瓜


Recipe source :  Y3K Magazine, Issue 59, 3/4-2011 

There is a lovely hue to pumpkin, bright and vibrant. The colour is so cheerful, I tend to think that it makes a dish look great. 

This is a simple stir-fry yet the taste was greatly enhanced with the addition of Chinese coriander and butter towards the end of cooking. 

Great dish!

Ingredients A


10g dried scallops, soaked and shredded       ( Original recipe used dried shrimps )
1 cup water ( water from soaking the dried scallops )
20g black fungus, soaked and cut into pieces
1 tbsp butter

Ingredients B


300g pumpkin, peeled and cut into chunks
2 pips garlic, chopped
1 shallot, chopped
2 stalks Chinese coriander, cut into sections of 3cm
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
2 tbsp cooking oil
  

Black fungus, pumpkin and dried and scallops

Method


1.  Heat 2 tbsp oil in wok. Stir-fry chopped garlic and shallots until slightly browned.
2.  Add in pumpkin and fry until the pumpkin has caramelised around the edges.
3.  Add in black fungus and fry for another minute.
4.  Add in the shredded dried scallops and water. Add more water if it is too dry.
5.  Cover with lid and let it simmer until liquid is absorbed.
6.  Uncover and add in butter, salt and sugar. Add coriander. Mix well.
7.  Dish up and serve.




I am linking this post to Little Thumbs Up

Photobucket

The theme for October 2014 is Pumpkin

Hosted by Eileen's Diary


I am also linking this post to Cook-Your-Book #17
Hosted by Joyce of Kitchen Flavours

Cook-Your-Books

Hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well In Flanders and 
co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House


Saturday, 11 October 2014

Nam Yue Bao ( Bacon Rolls ) 南乳包

Nam Yue Bao ( Bacon Rolls ) 南乳包


Recipe source for the Nam Yue rolls :  Adapted from The Hong Kong Cookbook
Recipe source for Bao skin :  Blue key Pau flour

These nam yue bao can be easily bought from the shops around the place I stay, but it is so satisfying to my sense of achievement to make them at home. It is even more satisfying when the bao turned out excellently. It is little wonder that we have such a large community of like-minded food bloggers who all love to cook and share!

Ingredients


350g pork belly, cut into 8 pieces about 1 cm thick
4 eggs, hard-boiled and with shells removed
30g shallots, sliced
2 tbsp cooking oil


Seasoning


1 1/2 cubes of nam yue
1/2 tbsp shao hsing wine
500ml water
2 tsp sugar
1 tsp black soya sauce
1 tsp oyster sauce
1/4 tsp five-spice powder


To cook the nam yue rolls


1.  Heat 2 tbsp oil in a wok and saute the sliced shallots until fragrant.
2.  Add in the pork slices and fry until colour changes. Add in seasoning and hard-boiled eggs and bring to a boil. Once it boils, reduce to small flame and allow to simmer for 30 minutes or until the pork slices are tender.
3.  Dish up and set aside to cool.
4.  Cut the eggs into halves. 


 The pork belly and eggs ready for assembling

Ingredients for bao skin


330g bao flour
1 tsp yeast
180ml water
50g sugar
1 tsp double-action baking powder
25g shortening


To make the bao skin

1. Combine the bao flour, sugar, double-action baking powder and shortening in a mixing bowl. Mix in the yeast and water. Whisk until the the ingredients form into a smooth dough.
2.  Place into a big bowl and cover the bowl with cling film. Allow it to proof for about 30 minutes or until double in size.


To assemble the bao

1.  Punch down the bao dough and divide the dough into 8 equal portions.
2.. Roll out one portion into an oval shape. Place one piece of pork belly in the middle of the rolled-out dough. Add half an egg on top of the pork belly.
3.  Fold in the two sides of the dough and place the bao on a piece of baking paper. 
4.  Repeat the process with the rest of the ingredients.
5.  Place the bao onto a steaming tray and allow to further proof for about 20 minutes.
4.  Steam the conventional way over boiling water for 10 minutes or in a steam oven.


 The wrapped-up nam yue bao set aside to proof




Fresh from the oven!


Closed-up view of the nam yue bao

Ready to be washed down with Chinese tea


I am linking this post to Best recipes for everyone #3 Oct 14 ~ Bun In My Hot Steamer
Hosted by Fion of XuanHom's Mom Kitchen Diary
 



I am also linking this post to Cook-Your-Book #17
Hosted by Joyce of Kitchen Flavours
Cook-Your-Books

Tuesday, 7 October 2014

Pumpkin Mock Abacus Seeds 南瓜算盘子

Pumpkin Mock Abacus Seeds  南瓜算盘子


Recipe source :  Y3K Magazine - Catherine Chia's kitchen

These lovely "abacus seeds" look so pretty. They look like golden coins. This can be a meal on its own, very similar to a pasta or a noodle dish and it is truly filling. These pumpkin abacus seeds are imitations of yam abacus seeds which is a traditional dish of the Hakka community.   
This delicacy is not something easily available nor is it widely sold in restaurants, well, at least not around the vicinity where I stay.   

I like this pumpkin coins more than the yam version. On its own, the pumpkin coins are rather bland. Once you add in the other ingredients it becomes a great dish. The ingredients were well blended to complement each other. Every mouthful is bursting with the wonderfully combined flavours of fragrant and chewy cuttle fish, mixed with crunchy black fungus and bits of minced pork.

I am always very happy to share when I stumbled upon a great recipe.
This is one of the fabulous ones! 


Ingredients A


600g pumpkin
300g tapioca flour
1 tbsp cooking oil


Ingredients B


1 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp minced shallot
1 tbsp dried shrimps ( soaked, drained and diced )              ( I used dried scallop )
100g minced chicken meat /pork
2 mushrooms ( soaked, drained and diced )
20g black fungus ( soaked and shredded )
50g dried cuttlefish shreds ( soaked )


Seasonings

2 tbsp oyster sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tbsp soy sauce
2 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp pepper


Garnishing


1 stalk Chinese parsley  )
1 stalk spring onion         )  all diced
1 fresh red chilli               )



Top left : diced mushrooms. Top right :  dried scallops
Bottom left :  shredded black fungus.Bottom right : Cuttlefish filaments

Minced pork

Method


1.  Peel pumpkin, cut into pieces. Steam tilled cooked and soft, drain off excess water. Add in tapioca flour and oil. Knead into a dough. Do it while the pumpkin is still hot.
2.  Pinch about 5g to 10g of dough and shape into rounds and use a finger to make a dented impression into the centre. ( To make them look like abacus seeds )
3.  Boil the pumpkin seeds in hot water till they float to the surface. Remove them with a slotted spoon and transfer them to a basin of cold water briefly. Drain away the water. Set aside. 
4.  Heat a wok with 2 tbsp oil. Saute the chopped garlic and shallots. Add in the diced mushrooms, black fungus, minced pork, dried scallops and the cuttlefish filaments. Stir-fry to mix everything together.
5.  Add in the seasoning ingredients and the par-boiled pumpkin seeds.
6.  Mix well, dish up and garnish. 


 Pumpkin seeds which has been par-boiled and drained in a colander




I am linking this post to Little Thumbs Up

Photobucket

The theme for October 2014 is Pumpkin

Hosted by Eileen's Diary


I am also linking this post to Cook-Your-Book #17
Hosted by Joyce of Kitchen Flavours

Cook-Your-Books

Monday, 29 September 2014

Salt-Baked Chicken 盐焗鸡

Salt-Baked Chicken 盐焗鸡



Concept source :  Y3K Magazine Issue 55, 7/8- 2010
Recipe source :  Doris Choo @ Sumptuous Flavours

I followed the concept of using a non-stick pot to bake this salt-baked chicken after reading Y3K magazine. I like this concept because you do not have to stir-fry the coarse salt in a large wok until the salt are hot and popping, which can be very hazardous if the hot salt pellets land on you. Moreover, once the wok is used to fry the salt, it will be damaged as the large amount of salt corrodes cast-iron or aluminium woks.

I adjusted the basic recipe and came up with my own version to cater to my personal preference.  That is because I have tasted a few varieties of salt-baked chicken sold in various shops. The most famous being the Ipoh salt-baked chicken. 

The taste is simply scrumptious! The saltiness had seeped into the meat and it was subtly flavoured by the piece of danggui and red dates. Perfect! It caters perfectly to my family's taste. Everyone is happy ! We had a very satisfying dinner.



Ingredients


3 chicken whole legs
3 pieces danggui
6 red dates, pitted
1 tbsp shao hsing wine
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp hot water
2 tbsp sesame oil, for brushing the baking paper


Materials required


6 pieces of baking/wax paper , cut into rectangles of 30cm x 23cm
1 kg coarse salt
1 large piece of aluminium foil to line the non-stick pot



 Danggui and red dates

Line the non-stick pot with aluminium foil

Method


1.  Place the red dates and danggui into a small bowl. Add 2 tbsp of hot water. Set aside to cool. 
2.  Once cooled down, add in 1 tsp salt and 1 tbsp shao shing wine.
3.  Line a non-stick pot with aluminium foil. 
4.  Fill the pot with coarse salt and heat on medium flame until the salt is hot. 
5.  While the salt is being heated, brush 1 piece of baking paper with sesame oil.
6.  Place 1 chicken whole leg onto the paper, brush with liquid from soaking the danggui and red dates. Then add in a piece of danggui and two red dates.
7.  Place another piece of baking paper under this sheet and wrap up the chicken whole leg. 
8.  Once the salt is heated through, remove half the amount of salt onto another container. Place the 3 pieces of wrapped chicken in the middle of the non-stick pot. Cover the wrapped chicken pieces with the salt  removed earlier and place lid on the pot.
9.  Bake for about 25 to 30 minutes. 
10. Carefully remove the layer of salt and remove the packages. 



Use double layers of baking paper to wrap the chicken thigh

I am linking this post to Cook-Your-Books #16  


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Sunday, 21 September 2014

Apple & Carrot With Cabbage In Soup 苹果红萝卜菜干汤

Apple & Carrot With Cabbage In Soup 苹果红萝卜菜干汤


Recipe source :  Soups for all seasons cookbook

I often boil dried Chinese cabbage soup but this is the first time I added apple and carrot to it. The soup is appetising with a very slight tinge of sourish flavour, brought about by the addition of apple. I find it rather refreshing. 

Ingredients


2 apples
8 oz carrot                           ( I used 1 carrot )
5oz dried cabbage            ( I used 3 oz      )
10oz pork shin                    ( I used 350g    )
4 sweetened candy dates ( I used 2 candy dates )
1/4 dried tangerine peel
salt to taste
2000 ml water


Preparation for dried Chinese cabbage

1.  Bring a pot of water to boil. 
2.  Add in the dried Chinese cabbage and switch off flame. 
3.  Allow to cool before cleaning the leaves.
4.  Change water several times and open up the leaves carefully to remove grit and dirt.
5.  Rinse several times and cut into 4cm lengths. 


Method


1.  Cut and core apples. 
2.  Peel and cut carrot into chunks
3.  Wash pork. Scald in boiling water. 
4.  Bring 2000 ml water to boil. Put in all the ingredients (except salt ) and bring to boil again. Lower heat and simmer over low heat for 2 hours.
5.  Add salt to taste.


I am linking this to Little Thumbs Up

Photobucket

The theme for September 2014 is Apple

Hosted by Kit @ I-Lost In Austen



I am also linking this post to Cook-Your-Books #16  


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